Citation:Wolffsohn JS,Jackson J,Hunt OA,Cottriall C,Lindsay J,Gilmour R,Sinclair A,Harper R.An enhanced functional ability questionnaire (faVIQ) to measure the impact of rehabilitation services on the visually impaired.Int J Ophthalmol 2014;7(1):77-85,doi:10.3980/j.issn.2222-3959.2014.01.14
An enhanced functional ability questionnaire (faVIQ) to measure the impact of rehabilitation services on the visually impaired
Received:May 31, 2013  Revised:October 25, 2013
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DOI:10.3980/j.issn.2222-3959.2014.01.14
Key Words:quality of life; visual impairment; low vision; functional ability; sensitivity; specificity
Fund Project:Supported by the Royal National Institute of the Blind, UK (No.226227)
Conflicts of Interest: Wolffsohn JS, None; Jackson J, None; Hunt OA, None; Cottriall C, None; Lindsay J, None; Gilmour R, None; Sinclair A, None; Harper R, None.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS: Simon Lannon who co-ordinated the data collection and the Royal National Institute for the Blind who helped to coordinated the focus groups.
                       
AuthorInstitution
James Stuart Wolffsohn Aston University, Life and Health Sciences, Ophthalmic Research Group, Birmingham, B4 7ET, UK
Jonathan Jackson Australian College of Optometry, Melbourne 3053, Australia
;Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast BT12 6BA, UK
Olivia Anne Hunt Aston University, Life and Health Sciences, Ophthalmic Research Group, Birmingham, B4 7ET, UK
Charles Cottriall Oxford Eye Hospital, Oxford OX3 9DU, UK
Jennifer Lindsay Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast BT12 6BA, UK
Richard Gilmour Altnagelvin Area Hospital, Londonderry BT47 6SB, UK
Anne Sinclair Low Vision Clinic, Fife Low Vision Centre for the Blind, Fife KY2 5EF, UK
Robert Harper Manchester Royal Eye Hospital and Manchester Academic and Health Science Centre, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Greater Manchester M13 9WL, UK
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Abstract:
      AIM:To develop a short, enhanced functional ability Quality of Vision (faVIQ) instrument based on previous questionnaires employing comprehensive modern statistical techniques to ensure the use of an appropriate response scale, items and scoring of the visual related difficulties experienced by patients with visual impairment.

    METHODS:Items in current quality-of-life questionnaires for the visually impaired were refined by a multi-professional group and visually impaired focus groups. The resulting 76 items were completed by 293 visually impaired patients with stable vision on two occasions separated by a month. The faVIQ scores of 75 patients with no ocular pathology were compared to 75 age and gender matched patients with visual impairment.

    RESULTS:Rasch analysis reduced the faVIQ items to 27. Correlation to standard visual metrics was moderate (r=0.32-0.46) and to the NEI-VFQ was 0.48. The faVIQ was able to clearly discriminate between age and gender matched populations with no ocular pathology and visual impairment with an index of 0.983 and 95% sensitivity and 95% specificity using a cut off of 29.

    CONCLUSION:The faVIQ allows sensitive assessment of quality-of-life in the visually impaired and should support studies which evaluate the effectiveness of low vision rehabilitation services.

PMC FullText Html:http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3949463/
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