Citation:Signes-Soler I,Hernández-Verdejo JL,Lumeras MAE,Verduras ET,P D. Piñero.Refractive error study in young subjects: results from a rural area in Paraguay.Int J Ophthalmol 2017;10(3):467-472,doi:10.18240/ijo.2017.03.22
Refractive error study in young subjects: results from a rural area in Paraguay
Received:January 18, 2016  Revised:April 28, 2016
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DOI:10.18240/ijo.2017.03.22
Key Words:refractive error  blindness  visual impairment  myopia  hyperopia
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Isabel Signes-Soler Non-governmental Organization Vision Without Borders Visio Sense Fronteres, Alicante 03710, Spain; School of Advanced Education, Research and Accreditation SAERA, Castellón de la Plana 12001, Spain
José Luis Hernández-Verdejo Non-governmental Organization Vision Without Borders Visio Sense Fronteres, Alicante 03710, Spain; Faculty of Optics and Optometry, University Complutense of Madrid, Madrid 28037, Spain
Miguel Angel Estrella Lumeras Non-governmental Organization Vision Without Borders Visio Sense Fronteres, Alicante 03710, Spain; European University of Madrid, Madrid 28108, Spain
Elena Tomás Verduras Non-governmental Organization Vision Without Borders Visio Sense Fronteres, Alicante 03710, Spain; School of Advanced Education, Research and Accreditation SAERA, Castellón de la Plana 12001, Spain
David P. Piñero Foundation for the Visual Quality FUNCAVIS, Alicante 03016, Spain; Department of Optics, Pharmacology, and Anatomy, University of Alicante, Alicante 03690, Spain
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Abstract:
      AIM: To evaluate the distribution of refractive error in young subjects in a rural area of Paraguay in the context of an international cooperation campaign for the prevention of blindness.

    METHODS: A sample of 1466 young subjects (ranging from 3 to 22 years old), with a mean age of 11.21±3.63 years old, were examined to assess their distance visual acuity (VA) and refractive error. The first screening examination performed by trained volunteers, included visual acuity testing, autokeratometry and non-cycloplegic autorefraction. Inclusion criteria for a second complete cycloplegic eye examination by an optometrist were VA <20/25 (0.10 logMAR or 0.8 decimal) and/or corneal astigmatism ≥1.50 D.

    RESULTS: An uncorrected distance VA of 0 logMAR (1.0 decimal) was found in 89.2% of children. VA <20/25 and/or corneal astigmatism ≥1.50 D was found in 3.9% of children (n=57), with a prevalence of hyperopia of 5.2% (0.2% of the total) in this specific group. Furthermore, myopia (spherical equivalent ≤-0.5 D) was found in 37.7% of the refracted children (0.5% of the total). The prevalence of refractive astigmatism (cylinder ≤-1.50 D) was 15.8% (0.6% of the total). Visual impairment (VI) (0.05≤VA≤0.3) was found in 12/114 (0.4%) of the refracted eyes. Main causes for VI were refractive error (58%), retinal problems (17%, 2/12), albinism (17%, 2/12) and unknown (8%, 1/12).

    CONCLUSION: A low prevalence of refractive error has been found in this rural area of Paraguay, with higher prevalence of myopia than of hyperopia.

PMC FullText Html:https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5360785/
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